The Jewish Museum

  • Amedeo Modigliani Study for "The Amazon," 1909 Black crayon on paper, 12⅛ x 9⅛ in. (30.8 × 23.2 cm). Paul Alexandre Family, courtesy of Richard Nathanson, London.

  • Amedeo Modigliani, Study for “The Amazon,” 1909 Black crayon on paper 12⅛ x 9⅛ in. (30.8 × 23.2 cm). Private collection, courtesy of Richard Nathanson, London. Image provided by Richard Nathanson, photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates, London

  • Amedeo Modigliani, Paul Alexandre, c. 1909 China ink on paper 10⅝ x 8¼ in. (27 x 21 cm) Private collection, courtesy of Richard Nathanson, London Image provided by Richard Nathanson, photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates, London

  • Amedeo Modigliani, c. 1912 Image provided by PVDE / Bridgeman Images, New York

  • A patron studies Chagall's “Fall of the Angel,” 1923 – 1947 in “Chagall: Love, War, and Exile”

  • Portrait of Helena Rubinstein

    Marie Laurencin, Portrait of Helena Rubinstein, 1934.

The Jewish Museum is a distinctive hub for art and Jewish culture for people from all backgrounds. Founded in 1904, the Museum was the first institution of its kind in the United States, and it is one of the oldest Jewish Museums in the world. It is devoted to exploring art and Jewish culture from ancient times to the contemporary world, with exhibitions and programs reflecting more than 4,000 years of Jewish culture and experience.

The JLGreene Foundation was proud to be the lead sponsor for Modigliani Unmasked, an exhibition of the artist’s early drawings. These works illuminated Modigliani’s Jewish heritage and were pivotal to understanding his artistic output. The Foundation was also the sole funder for the 2004  Modigliani: Beyond the Myth, which was the first major exhibition of the artist since a 1951 retrospective at MoMA.

In 2006 the Foundation endowed the Jewish Museum with $5 million to provide a permanent income stream for the Museum to present exhibitions of the highest quality. In addition to Modigliani Unmasked, the endowment has funded Action/Abstraction: Pollock, de Kooning, and American Art, 1940-1976 (2008); Edouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940 (2012); Chagall: Love, War, and Exile (2013); Helena Rubenstein: Beauty is Power (2014); Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design (2016); Camille Pissarro: Impressionist Innovator (1995); An Expressionist in Paris: The Paintings of Chaim Soutine (1998); Sarah Bernhardt: The Art of High Drama (2005); and Alias Man Ray: The Art of Reinvention (2009).

The Foundation also funded the establishment of the Dawn and Jerome L. Greene Gallery in 1993 as part of the Museum’s collection exhibition Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey (1993-2016). The gallery will reopen in January 2018 when the Museum’s new collection exhibition, Scenes from the Collection, opens to the public.